Virtual Words: Language on the Edge of Science and Technology

Virtual Words Language on the Edge of Science and Technology The technological realm provides an unusually active laboratory not only for new ideas and products but also for the remarkable linguistic innovations that accompany and describe them How else would w

  • Title: Virtual Words: Language on the Edge of Science and Technology
  • Author: Jonathon Keats
  • ISBN: 9780195398540
  • Page: 265
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The technological realm provides an unusually active laboratory not only for new ideas and products but also for the remarkable linguistic innovations that accompany and describe them How else would words like qubit a unit of quantum information , crowdsourcing outsourcing to the masses , or in vitro meat chicken and beef grown in an industrial vat enter our language The technological realm provides an unusually active laboratory not only for new ideas and products but also for the remarkable linguistic innovations that accompany and describe them How else would words like qubit a unit of quantum information , crowdsourcing outsourcing to the masses , or in vitro meat chicken and beef grown in an industrial vat enter our language In Virtual Words Language on the Edge of Science and Technology, Jonathon Keats, author of Wired Magazine s monthly Jargon Watch column, investigates the interplay between words and ideas in our fast paced tech driven use it or lose it society In 28 illuminating short essays, Keats examines how such words get coined, what relationship they have to their subject matter, and why some, like blog, succeed while others, like flog, fail Divided into broad categories such as commentary, promotion, and slang, in addition to scientific and technological neologisms chapters each consider one exemplary word, its definition, origin, context, and significance Examples range from microbiome the collective genome of all microbes hosted by the human body and unparticle a form of matter lacking definite mass to gene foundry a laboratory where artificial life forms are assembled and singularity a hypothetical future moment when technology transforms the whole universe into a sentient supercomputer Together these words provide not only a survey of technological invention and its consequences, but also a fascinating glimpse of novel language as it comes into being No one knows this emerging lexical terrain better than Jonathon Keats In writing that is as inventive and engaging as the language it describes, Virtual Words offers endless delights for word lovers, technophiles, and anyone intrigued by the essential human obsession with naming.

    • Virtual Words: Language on the Edge of Science and Technology by Jonathon Keats
      265 Jonathon Keats
    • thumbnail Title: Virtual Words: Language on the Edge of Science and Technology by Jonathon Keats
      Posted by:Jonathon Keats
      Published :2019-08-25T23:36:18+00:00

    About "Jonathon Keats"

    1. Jonathon Keats

      Jonathon Keats is an American conceptual artist and experimental philosopher known for creating large scale thought experiments Keats was born in New York City and studied philosophy at Amherst College He now lives in San Francisco and Italy.

    420 thoughts on “Virtual Words: Language on the Edge of Science and Technology”

    1. Disapointtingly unrelated to words.I managed to read the entire book, albiet skipping 2 essays, for it was short and easy. I was mostly annoyed at the disconnect between what the book was summarized in the inner flap and the book itself. With Keats writing in Wired I'd figure there would be a greate focus on semantics, about the modern origin of words where technology has allowed us to share them ever more than before. Most of the essays spent there time instead discussing the history behind the [...]


    2. A fun, easy read on how words get introduced into the vocabulary, with a real tech orientation befitting its origins in a Wired magazine column. Some of these were a bit obscure to me, revealing I'm sure something about my age and how little time I spend reading blogs.



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