Spider Boys

Spider Boys From Publishers Weekly Impressively confident in tone Cher s arresting first novel details the lives of street urchins and petty criminals in the Singapore of the s The depradations of the WWII J

  • Title: Spider Boys
  • Author: Ming Cher
  • ISBN: 9780140250503
  • Page: 259
  • Format: Hardcover
  • From Publishers Weekly Impressively confident in tone, Cher s arresting first novel details the lives of street urchins and petty criminals in the Singapore of the 1950s The depradations of the WWII Japanese occupation are alluded to only in passing, but the lawlessness and rebelliousness that shadow these characters are its direct result Spider boys capture and train smFrom Publishers Weekly Impressively confident in tone, Cher s arresting first novel details the lives of street urchins and petty criminals in the Singapore of the 1950s The depradations of the WWII Japanese occupation are alluded to only in passing, but the lawlessness and rebelliousness that shadow these characters are its direct result Spider boys capture and train small wrestling spiders to compete in matches for substantial stakes Teenaged Kwang is the boys leader, fiercely and exclusively dedicated to his spiders, much to the chagrin of his girlfriend, Kim, with the always ready to laugh eyes Kwang, who adheres to a strict moral code even when engaged in criminal or vengeful activities, is the rival of Chai, a less sterling character, and is preyed upon by Smiling Yeow, a murderous criminal whose plans to use the boys in larger gambling operations signals an end to their comparatively innocent lives The action builds to thrilling descriptions of the Spider Olympic Games What follows is an anticlimax capped by a hasty denouement But this is a small flaw in a notable debut in which Cher mines the abbreviated, hard edged local street slang to yield prose of stunning emotional impact The narrative moves among its characters in quick cuts, but the exposures go remarkably deep nonetheless, revealing this exotic milieu as the universal world of any child growing into adulthood.

    • Spider Boys ¦ Ming Cher
      259 Ming Cher
    • thumbnail Title: Spider Boys ¦ Ming Cher
      Posted by:Ming Cher
      Published :2019-05-08T14:14:13+00:00

    About "Ming Cher"

    1. Ming Cher

      Born in Singapore in 1947 in Bukit Ho Swee, then a slum village in Singapore, Ming Cher was one of seven children He left school at thirteen and became a street drifter in the manner of the characters in his debut novel, Spider Boys First published by Penguin New Zealand and William Morrow in 1995, the critically acclaimed book was one of the first Singapore novels released by major publishing houses overseas, and is notable for its inventive use of colloquial Singapore English It was republished in grammatical Standard English by Epigram Books as part of its Singapore Classics series in 2012.The 1995 recipient of the Buddle Findlay Sargeson Fellowship, Ming Cher has also worked as a construction supervisor on a hospital project in South Vietnam at the height of the Vietnam War, a merchant seaman, and an importer and retailer of Indonesian goods He has lived in New Zealand since 1977.

    158 thoughts on “Spider Boys”

    1. rất ngạc nhiên khi được đọc một cuốn tiểu thuyết về Singapore năm 1955, với bọn trẻ con đường phố và các băng nhóm, đánh nhau đấu nhện, và sex thì cứ gọi là tự nhiên như không =)) có một chương có một tên rất hài và vô cùng bẩn bựa xin không được phép tiết lộ ở chốn văn minh như nơi này =)))kỳ diệu ở chỗ ông tác giả chỉ đi học đến 13 tuổi xong là đi lao động chân tay, xong l [...]


    2. I really wanted to like this, because it offered the possibility of presenting parts of Singaporean life not often selected for literary adventure. Alas, it fell way short of my expectations. The plot was weak and scattered, and none of the characters seemed real or well-rounded enough to endear themselves to the reader. The result was a fairly boring storyline lacking in compelling taste for the Singapore of the 1950s.


    3. This is a story of the not-so-modern Singapore my mom grew up in. My whole life she told me stories of her harsh childhood, the atap-chu, the kampongs, the satay man. When I finally got there in '95, I had no idea what she was talking about. It wasn't until my uncle lent me this book about a year ago, that I was able to confirm that this time existed. Though I wish it was more or less a memoir of Singapore street life in the 50's (and a little less of the spider boys), it's the closest thing I'v [...]


    4. This book endeared itself to me not only because of the content but because the author uses his language so well. As a teacher I would have to correct his English if he were writing for, e.g The New York Times, but he is using his own language to introduce his early life to his children and anyone else who gets interested. He is a fantastic writer.


    5. “Spider Boys draws us into an exotic world which becomes increasingly familiar and engaging with every page. In Ming Cher’s hands, the hybrid dialect of Singapore street youth becomes uncannily evocative and poetic. At times I was reminded of S.E. Hinton, but this is a highly original novel—gritty and tender and thoroughly fascinating.”—Jay McInerney, author of Bright Lights, Big City and Brightness Falls“Haunting and sexy, Spider Boys is an astonishing book. Ming Cher’s jagged Eng [...]


    6. Ming Cher paints a fascinating portrait of Singapore in the fifties,seedy underbelly and all.I wish there was a version available that kept the original Singlish and Hokkien dialogue though,as some of the literal translations to English sound very stilted.Worth reading ,especially if you're Singaporean,even despite the abrupt ending.


    7. Written in pidgin english, street kids come of age quick in Singapore of the 1950's. Gambling over fighting spiders, engaging in all manner of juvenile delinquency, discovering sex -- all manner of fun. I dunno why, I like books written in dialect and vernacular.


    8. This book won't win any awards for plot. But it does present a fascinating and vivid (and bawdy, and often funny) picture of life in Singapore in the 1950s.



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